V. Freedom to View

                                                                                                                                               Approved by Board 12-10-98

 

 

Freedom to View

 

(Adopted by the Educational Film Library Association, February 1979)

 

            The FREEDOM TO VIEW, along with the freedom to speak, to hear, and

 

to read, is protected by the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United

 

States.  In a free society, there is no place for censorship of any medium of

 

expression.  Therefore, we affirm these principles:

 

            1.  It is in the public interest to provide the broadest possible access to films and other audiovisual materials because they have proven to be among the most effective means for communication of ideas.  Liberty of circulation is essential to insure the constitutional guarantees of freedom of expression.

 

            2.  It is in the public interest to provide for our audiences, films and other audiovisual materials which represent a diversity of views and expression.  Selection of a work does not constitute or imply agreement with or approval of the content.

 

            3.  It is our professional responsibility to resist the constraint of labeling or prejudging a film on the basis of the moral, religious, or political beliefs of the producer or filmmaker or on the basis of controversial content.

 

            4.  It is our professional responsibility to contest vigorously, by all lawful means, every encroachment upon the publicís freedom to view.